The Real Estate Empire of Walt Disney


The home has since been renovated and turned into a heritage site called The Walt Disney Birthplace.

the exterior of Walt Disney's first home

Outside Walt Disney’s first home.

The Walt Disney Birthplace


The Walt Disney Birthplace website says, “We have already lost too many buildings that were an incredibly important part of Walt Disney’s history. And that is why we have purchased this house and will restore it to its original state, honoring and preserving the home for generations to come.”

It took five years for the home to be renovated to appear as it did in 1893, ABC7 reported in 2018.

The renovation reportedly cost several hundreds of thousands of dollars.

the parlor in Disney's former home

The parlor in Disney’s former home.

The Walt Disney Birthplace


The bay window looks out over the front porch.

Disney and his brother Roy shared a bedroom as children.

Walt and Roy's former bedroom, which is painted blue

Walt and Roy’s former bedroom.

The Walt Disney Birthplace


The brothers shared a lifelong bond, started in the bedroom pictured above.

Walt Disney moved to Los Angeles in 1923. Four years later, he built this home on Lyric Avenue.

the exterior of Walt Disney's Lyric Avenue home in Los Angeles, California

Walt Disney’s Lyric Avenue home in Los Angeles, California.


Krista Ames-Cook



According to Los Angeles Magazine, his brother Roy built an identical home next door. 

In 1932, Disney and his wife, Lillian, built a family home in Los Feliz, California.

the exterior of Disney's Los Feliz home

Outside Disney’s Los Feliz home.

Patricia Ruben


According to Disney Examiner, Disney worked with architect Frank Crowhurst to design the Tudor- and French-style home.

It was last listed in 2014 for $3.65 million.

the living room in Disney's former home

The living room in Disney’s former home.

Patricia Ruben


According to Collider, the home cost $50,000 to construct and was built mainly by unemployed Depression-era workers. 

The Disneys lived at the home from 1932 to 1950.

inside walt disney's former home

Inside the home.

Patricia Ruben


Special touches, like the painted ceiling and wrought iron railing, give the home a storybook feel.

A spacious dining area shows off the Tudor-style architecture.

the dining area in walt disney's former home

The dining area in Disney’s former home.

Patricia Ruben


Disney lived at the home with his wife and two daughters, Diane and Sharon.

The billiard room, one of 12 rooms in the house, was no doubt a good place for Disney to unwind.

the billiard room in Disney's former home

The billiard room in Disney’s former home.

Patricia Ruben


There are five Disney resort hotels that have complimentary pool tables.

A spacious master bedroom features French-door windows.

the master bedroom at Disney's former home, which is painted white

The master bedroom at Disney’s former home.

Patricia Ruben


There are four bedrooms in the home.

The private screening room, pictured below, was where Disney watched many of his films, according to the home’s most recent listing.

the sitting area in Disney's home

The sitting area in Disney’s home.

Patricia Ruben


The Disney family would come together to watch movies and screenings from the studio.

Some of Disney’s most famous films were released while he lived in his Los Feliz home.

the screening room in walt disney's former home

The screening room.

Patricia Ruben


“Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” was released in 1937, “Pinocchio” was released in 1940, “Fantasia” was released in 1940, “Dumbo” was released in 1941, “Bambi” was released in 1942, and “Cinderella” was released in 1950.

Details like this storybook ceiling make the home look like something out of a Disney movie.

a sitting area in walt disney's former home

A sitting area.

Patricia Ruben


The room looks like it could be right out of “Sleeping Beauty,” which, according to Collider, was imagined while Disney lived in the home.

Disney built his vacation home in Palm Springs in 1962 as a retreat for him and his wife, Lillian.

the exterior and pool of Disney's Palm Springs vacation home

Outside Disney’s Palm Springs vacation home.

Ruben Vargas Jr./Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate/Leaskou Partners


He lived in the home with Lillian until his death in 1966.

He called it his “Technicolor Dream House.” It sold last year for $1.1 million.

the living room in Disney's Palm Springs home

The living room in Disney’s Palm Springs home.

Ruben Vargas Jr./Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate/Leaskou


It sold in May 2020.

The interior features bright red accents.

inside Disney's "Technicolor Dream House"

Inside Disney’s Palm Springs home.

Ruben Vargas Jr./Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate/Leaskou


He didn’t call it his “Technicolor Dream House” for nothing.

The home’s many windows allow for light to flow throughout.

the dining area in Disney's Palm Springs home, which looks out onto the lawn

The dining area in Disney’s Palm Springs home.

Ruben Vargas Jr./Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate/Leaskou


The dining area opens right up to the backyard.

The one-story home has four bedrooms.

a guest bedroom at Disney's Palm Springs home with one wall painted orange and blue carpet

A guest bedroom at Disney’s Palm Springs home.

Ruben Vargas Jr./Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate/Leaskou Partners


Bright accent walls keep with the technicolor theme. 

Walt Disney’s final home was his Carolwood Estate, where he lived until his death in 1966. The home has since been torn down.

Disney driving a train behind his Carolwood home.

Disney driving a train behind his Carolwood home.

Gene Lester/Archive Photos/Getty Images


Above he can be seen riding a train outside his Carolwood home. He built the one-eighth scale train and named it the Carolwood Pacific Railroad.

Just over a year after Lillian’s death in 1997, businessman Gabriel Brener bought the property for $8.45 million and knocked down the home. In its place, he built a 35,000-square-foot mansion in 2001. The eight-bedroom mansion, which sits on 3.6 acres of land, sold in 2014 for $74 million, according to the Los Angeles Times.



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